02 May 2012

Intellectual property implications of holograms


Faux entertainers and fashion law fun!


By now most of us have heard about the Tupac Shakur hologram performance at Coachella. But I have yet to see anyone discuss the fashion law related intellectual property implications that such holograms bring up!
              
When I first heard of Tupac's hologram I remembered that he is currently a 'Draw Something' app art prompt. This got me wondering who is promoting Tupac so much. As my conspiracy theories about Tupac being alive wore off, I refocused and started wondering who is profiting from Tupac's image. Being too lazy/uninterested to even google this I figure Dr. Dre and Snoop Dogg are the ones who mainly profit.


Source: mtv.com via Fashion on Pinterest


While news outlets and blogs have covered the technology behind the hologram, the sudden rise in Tupac's album sales, and the possibility of taking him on tour, I was most concerned with what Tupac was wearing. 

Trademarks* and Copyrights**
Tupac's hologram wore his album cover's look: belted baggy jeans and what I assume are Timberland boots.

What are some trademark implications of holograms?
Holograms can easily bring up new legal ground for courts.
I imagine it could depend on how the brand feels about the use. Let's say a designer does not want to have his/her trademark on a hologram. What should be the determining factor? If the person wore the clothes while alive, does that make the trademark fair game? If the physical garments are purchased in material form, should they be allowed to be reflected in holograms? Or if a brand wants to be promoted in holograms, who should decide whether it is right? Is this an ethical question? 

Should holograms only 'wear' things worn by the person who the hologram is made of?
Another trademark consideration here could be whether IP extension would exist if artists were introduced to the public in hologram form (a la Gorillaz); in such a case, the artist could be argued to be a trademark of the record label. In such a case protection would always be viable. Then artists would be  contracted out through IP licensing agreements or moved to new owners through a transfer of IP rights.

Copyright protection may be similarly implicated here; however, one justifications for limiting copyright rights is that a copyright protection should not protect technological innovation more appropriate for patent law protection.

Right of Publicity***

In terms of right to publicity, I think it is fascinating that celebrities could potentially create contracts about what they will be wearing or how they will displayed post-death. Estate's can already cash in by licensing IP or getting royalty payments, I don't think a hologram should be treated differently.

Do you think celebrities should be able to contract with designers over what the celebrity will wear after death as a hologram? 

♥ Thanks for reading and supporting my blog! 
*Trademarks are distinctive source identifiers, words, logos, slogans, or a combo thereof, used in connection with goods or services.
**Copyright protection subsists in original works of authorship fixed in a tangible medium of expression.
***Right of publicity confers property-type interest to protect an individual's marketable image or persona.



12 comments:

  1. Interesting issue that you are bringing to light. I think it is fair to say that the hologram images should keep wearing items from their day and time as the concept is to bring back "a blast from the past". There is always a possibility of copyright issues as America is so sue happy. Nothing surprises me these days! Lol

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks for sharing your opinion!!

      Delete
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  3. You always have the most interesting issues in your blog. Enjoyed it very much.

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    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm glad you find them interesting! Thank you!!

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  4. You raise an interesting point. I would think that there could be real trademark implications cases with a continued use of holograms. I can also see a potential for commercial opportunities there.

    Rowena @ rolala loves

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    Replies
    1. Yes that's why I'm surprised not to have heard anything on such possibilities.

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  5. I agree with the first comment, but I also think it depends. If the reason for bringing people back through holograms is to attract a new audience, wearing current looks or brands would meet the goal better. If the goal is to transport the viewer back to a different time then the old look should stay.

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